Anarchy And the Law: The Political Economy of Choice

Front Cover
Edward Stringham
Transaction Publishers, 2007 - 698 pages
2 Reviews

Private-property anarchism, also known as anarchist libertarianism, individualist anarchism, and anarcho-capitalism, is a political philosophy and set of economic and legal arguments that maintains that, just as the markets and private institutions of civil society provide food, shelter, and other human needs, markets and contracts should provide law and that the rule of law itself can only be understood as a private institution.

To the libertarian, the state and its police powers are not benign societal forces, but a system of conquest, authoritarianism, and occupation. But whereas limited government libertarians argue in favor of political constraints, anarchist libertarians argue that, to check government against abuse, the state itself must be replaced by a social order of self-government based on contracts. Indeed, contemporary history has shown that limited government is untenable, as it is inherently unstable and prone to corruption, being dependent on the interest-group politics of the state's current leadership. Anarchy and the Law presents the most important essays explaining, debating, and examining historical examples of stateless orders.

Section I, "Theory of Private Property Anarchism," presents articles that criticize arguments for government law enforcement and discuss how the private sector can provide law. In Section II, "Debate," limited government libertarians argue with anarchist libertarians about the morality and viability of private-sector law enforcement. Section III, "History of Anarchist Thought," contains a sampling of both classic anarchist works and modern studies of the history of anarchist thought and societies. Section IV, "Historical Case Studies of Non-Government Law Enforcement," shows that the idea that markets can function without state coercion is an entirely viable concept. Anarchy and the Law is a comprehensive reader on anarchist libertarian thought that will be welcomed by students of government, political science, history, philosophy, law, economics, and the broader study of liberty.

Edward P. Stringham is professor of economics at San Jose State University and a research fellow at The Independent Institute. He is president of the Association of Private Enterprise Education, editor of the Journal of Private Enterprise, and the editor of Anarchy, State, and Public Choice.

  

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The author has not considered the big picture in discussing his various recommendations for non-governmental institutions. The major flaw in most of these government cure-alls, is that we are all doomed to repeat all our mistakes in the sociopolitical world until wen find a way to control people's inherent greed---greed for money, for power etc. So until there's a fix for human nature, I'd rather be a hammer than a nail. 

Contents

II
1
III
18
IV
40
V
57
VI
75
VII
107
VIII
127
IX
149
XXIV
371
XXV
377
XXVI
399
XXVII
424
XXVIII
437
XXIX
451
XXX
461
XXXI
469

X
163
XI
193
XII
218
XIII
232
XIV
250
XV
259
XVI
268
XVII
284
XVIII
292
XIX
295
XX
315
XXI
322
XXII
341
XXIII
354
XXXII
484
XXXIII
499
XXXIV
504
XXXV
538
XXXVI
565
XXXVII
586
XXXVIII
602
XXXIX
624
XL
639
XLI
658
XLII
680
XLIV
683
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