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JACKSON'S ENGAGEMENT mih the British at NEW ORLEANS.

8?"Jummary 1815 HISTORY OF THE WAR

BETWEEN THE
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA,

AND

GREAT BRITAIN;

: COMPRISING
... A PARTICULAR DETAIL OF THE

.
NAVAL AND MILITARY OPERATIONS,
AND A FAITHFUL RECORD OF THE EVENTS PRO..

duCED DURING THE CONTEST.
From its Commencement, June 18, 1812, to the so
Treaty of Peace, ratified at the City of

Washington, February 17, 1815.

Third Edition, revised and corrected

610 mer

CAREFULLY COMPILED FROM OFFICIAL DOCUMENTS.

NEW-YORK:
PRINTED AND PUBLISHED BY JOHN LOW,:**

AT SHAKESPEAR'S HEAD,
. NO. 17 CHATHAM-STREET.

District of New-York, ss.
BE IT REMEMBERED, That on the twenty-third day of Febru.

ary, in the fortieth year of the Independence of the United L. S. S tes of America, Joun Low, of the said district, hath depos

ited in this office the title of a Book, the right whereof he olaims as Proprietor, in the words following, to wit:

« An Impartial and Corrct History of the War between the United States of America, and Great Britain , comprising a particular de tail of the Naval and Military operations, and a fait.ifii) record of the events produced during the contestFrom its Commencement, June 18, 1812, to the Treaty of Prace, ratified at the City of Washington, February 17, 1815. Third edition, revised and corrested. Carefully compiled from official documents."

In conformity to the act of the Congress of the United States, entitled, “ An act for the encouragement of Learning, by securing the copies of Mans, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the time therein metioned And also to an act, entitled “An act, supplementary to an act, entitled an Act for the enc learni g, by securing the copies of Maps, Charts, and Books, to the authors and proprietors of such copies during the times thereiv mentionled, and extending the benefits thereof to the arts of designing, engraving and etching historical and other prints.”

THERON RUDD,
Clerk of the Southern District of New York,

6 MAY 1931

NO era, in the moral world, has excited the public curiosity, or effected the general interest of mankind, more than the discovery of a western continent, in the year 192. Attracted as the public mind was by that event, yet its resulting importance was not then fully anticipated by the most extravagant hopes, or the most acute prognostics. To convert the natural riches of the new world to the advantage of the old, was the only object which the kings of Europe wished to accomplish, or intended to essay. Neither king nor subject expected that the western world would become the seat of empires, independent of European rulers; much less did they expect, that the future monarchs of the eastould meet in the new world, rivals capable of opposing and defeating attempts at continuing in political sub jection, the descendants of emigrants, led to the new continent by cupidity, driven to it by persecution, or banished as an expiation of their crimes.

It was not until long after the first settlement of America by Europeans, that it was sagacious. ly observed, that “ the new world seemed destined to give laws to the old." The observation drew forth but the derision or contempt of the hearers and readers. A prophecy so improbable, and which could not, it was supposed, be accom

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