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Queen and myself great pleasure, and has consolidat strengthened the bonds of friendship which have so lo happily united the two allied nations.

My relations with foreign Powers continue to be frien The difficulties which unfortunately arose in SouthEurope in the autumn of last year have happily result practical solution and in the maintenance of peace, wh constitutional régime in the Turkish Empire continues t satisfactory progress.

Subject to certain reservations made by my Plenipoter at the time of signature, I have ratified such of the Conv which resulted from the Peace Conference held at The Ha 1907 as do not require municipal legislation in this c to give effect to their provisions. Arbitration Conventions and Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, and for a further term of five years. expire, are in process of renewal.

A measure for improving Indian administration by enla the numbers and extending the functions of the various Le tive Councils has become law, duly supplemented b necessary Regulations.

Early in the coming year the Councils will have constituted, and will undertake the burden of their responsibilities.

I look with confidence for their loyal co-operation wit appointed officers in the tasks of government, thus furth the moral and material progress of my Indian subjects, strengthening the foundations of my Empire.

I have, with the greatest satisfaction, assented to the establishing the Union of South Africa, which embodies united wishes of the Parliaments of the four constituent Cold

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This fruit of the success which has attended the grant of institutions to my new Colonies is, I am assured, a matte cordial congratulation throughout my dominions.

I cannot doubt that union will add to the strength of S Africa, and I pray that its people may be blessed in the year come with growing prosperity and lasting concord.

The important Conference which met in July last for exchange of views between my Government and the Governm of my self-governing dominions beyond the seas upon the sub of naval and military defence has been of great mutual advanta and as the outcome of its deliberations it may confidently expected that the stability of my dominions will be preser and their unity promoted.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

I thank you for the liberality and care with which y provided for the heavy additions to the national expenditure c to the requirements of Imperial defence and social reform.

I regret that that provision has proved unavailing.

Queen and myself great pleasure, and has consolidated and strengthened the bonds of friendship which have so long and happily united the two allied nations."

My relations with foreign Powers continue to be friendly. The difficulties which unfortunately arose in South-Easter Europe in the autumn of last year have happily resulted in practical solution and in the maintenance of peace, while the constitutional régime in the Turkish Empire continues to make satisfactory progress.

Subject to certain reservations made by my Plenipotentiaries at the time of signature, I have ratified such of the Conventions which resulted from the Peace Conference held at The Hague it 1907 as do not require municipal legislation in this country to give effect to their provisions. Arbitration Conventions and Agreements with Germany. Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, and Portugal have been renewed for a further term of five years. Others, which are about to expire, are in process of renewal.

A measure for improving Indian administration by enlarging the numbers and extending the functions of the various Legisla tive Councils has become law, duly supplemented by the necessary Regulations.

Early in the coming year the Councils will have been constituted, and will undertake the burden of their new responsibilities.

I look with confidence for their loyal co-operation with my appointed officers in the tasks of government, thus furthering the moral and material progress of my Indian subjects, and strengthening the foundations of my Empire.

I have, with the greatest satisfaction, assented to the Act establishing the Union of South Africa, which embodies the united wishes of the Parliaments of the four constituent Colonies

This fruit of the success which has attended the grant of free institutions to my new Colonies is, I am assured, a matter of dominions. cordial congratulation throughout my

I cannot doubt that union will add to the strength of South Africa, and I pray that its people may be blessed in the years to come with growing prosperity and lasting concord.

The important Conference which met in July last for the exchange of views between my Government and the Governments of my self-governing dominions beyond the seas upon the subject of naval and military defence has been of great mutual advantage. and as the outcome of its deliberations it may confidently be expected that the stability of my dominions will be preserved and their unity promoted.

Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

I thank you for the liberality and care with which you provided for the heavy additions to the national expenditure due to the requirements of Imperial defence and social reform. I regret that that provision has proved unavailing.

GREAT BRITAIN.

My Lords and Gentlemen,

An Irish Land Act has been passed which, by relieving local funds from liabilities arising under previous Purchase Acts and by increasing the administrative area and the resources of the Congested Districts Board, will, I sincerely hope, conduce both to the general welfare of the country and to a permanent improvement in the condition of the occupiers of small holdings in the west of Ireland.

I have watched with interest the progress of a measure, which has now been placed upon the Statute Book, for facilitating the housing of the working classes and for strengthening the law dealing with the sanitary conditions under which they live.

This measure also contains long-needed provisions for controlling the development of towns with a view to securing not only improved sanitary conditions, but also amenity and con

venience.

I have given my assent to a Bill for the establishment of Labour Exchanges, which will, I trust, be an important step towards the better regulation of the labour market and a foundation for further measures for dealing effectively with some of the evils of unemployment.

The measure which has been passed for the constitution of Trade Boards in certain industries will, I hope, with judicious administration, prove a valuable boon to a specially helpless class

of workers.

I anticipate beneficial results to agriculture and to the rural industries of the country from the measure for the economic development of the United Kingdom and for the improvement of

roads.

I have had pleasure in assenting to a Bill to give effect to a Treaty which secures the full benefits of the French law of Workmen's Compensation to British workmen injured in the course of their employment in France.

Important Bills have also been passed dealing with Trawling in prohibited areas, the consolidation and amendment of the law relating to Assurance Companies, the suppression of gambling on loss by maritime perils, and the amendment of the Electric Lighting Acts.

I thank you for the zeal with which you have discharged your arduous and protracted labours, and pray that they may be rewarded by the blessing of Almighty God.

ACT of the British Parliament to constitute the Union of South Africa.

[9 Edw. VII, c. 9.]

[September 20, 1909.] WHEREAS it is desirable for the welfare and future progress of South Africa that the several British Colonies therein should

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be united under one Government in a Legislative Union und Crown of Great Britain and Ireland;

And whereas it is expedient to make provision for the of the Colonies of the Cape of Good Hope, Natal, the Trai and the Orange River Colony on terms and conditions to they have agreed by resolution of their respective Parlia and to define the executive, legislative, and judicial pow be exercised in the government of the Union;

And whereas it is expedient to make provision fo establishment of provinces with powers of legislatio administration in local matters and in such other m as may be specially reserved for provincial legislation administration;

And whereas it is expedient to provide for the eve admission into the Union or transfer to the Union of such of South Africa as are not originally included therein :

Be it therefore enacted by the King's most Excellent Ma by and with the advice and consent of the Lords Spiritua Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assen and by the authority of the same, as follows:

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PART I.-Preliminary.

1. This Act may be cited as "The South Africa Act, 19 2. In this Act, unless it is otherwise expressed or im the words "the Union" shall be taken to mean the Uni South Africa as constituted under this Act, and the "Houses of Parliament," "House of Parliament," or "P ment," shall be taken to mean the Parliament of the Union.

3. The provisions of this Act referring to the King extend to His Majesty's heirs and successors in the soverei of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

PART II.-The Union.

4. It shall be lawful for the King, with the advice of Privy Council, to declare by proclamation that, on and aft day therein appointed, not being later than one year after passing of this Act, the Colonies of the Cape of Good Natal, the Transvaal, and the Orange River Colony, herein called the Colonies, shall be united in a Legislative U under one Government under the name of the Union of S Africa.* On and after the day appointed by such proclama the Government and Parliament of the Union shall have power and authority within the limits of the Colonies, but King may at any time after the proclamation appoin Governor-General for the Union.

5. The provisions of this Act shall, unless it is other

*See Proclamation of December 2, 1909. Page 39.

expressed or implied, take effect on and after the day so appointed.

6. The Colonies mentioned in section 4 shall become original provinces of the Union under the names of Cape of Good Hope, Natal, Transvaal, and Orange Free State, as the case may be. The original provinces shall have the same limits as the respective Colonies at the establishment of the Union.

7. Upon any colony entering the Union, "The Colonial Boundaries Act, 1895,"* and every other Act applying to any of the Colonies as being self-governing colonies or colonies with responsible government, shall cease to apply to that colony, but as from the date when this Act takes effect every such Act of Parliament shall apply to the Union.

PART III.-Executive Government.

8. The Executive Government of the Union is vested in the King, and shall be administered by His Majesty in person or by a Governor-General as his representative.

9. The Governor-General shall be appointed by the King, and shall have and may exercise in the Union during the King's pleasure, but subject to this Act, such powers and functions of the King as His Majesty may be pleased to assign to him.

10. There shall be payable to the King out of the Consolidated Revenue Fund of the Union for the salary of the Governor-General an annual salary of 10,0007. The salary of the Governor-General shall not be altered during his continuance in office.

11. The provisions of this Act relating to the GovernorGeneral extend and apply to the Governor-General for the time being or such person as the King may appoint to administer the government of the Union. The King may authorize the Governor-General to appoint any person to be his deputy within the Union during his temporary absence, and in that capacity to exercise for and on behalf of the Governor-General during such absence all such powers and authorities vested in the Governor-General as the Governor-General may assign to him subject to any limitations expressed or directions given by the King; but the appointment of such deputy shall not affec the exercise by the Governor-General himself of any power o function.

12. There shall be an Executive Council to advise th Governor-General in the government of the Union, and th members of the council shall be chosen and summoned by th Governor-General and sworn as executive councillors, and sha hold office during his pleasure.

13. The provisions of this Act referring to the Governo General in Council shall be construed as referring to th

* Vol. LXXXVII, page 967.

Governor-General acting with the advice of the Executive Council.

14. The Governor-General may appoint officers not exceeding ten in number to administer such departments of State of the Union as the Governor-General in Council may establish; such officers shall hold office during the pleasure of the GovernorGeneral. They shall be members of the Executive Council and shall be the King's Ministers of State for the Union. After the first general election of members of the House of Assembly, as hereinafter provided, no Minister shall hold office for a longer period than three months unless he is or becomes a member of either House of Parliament.

15. The appointment and removal of all officers of the public service of the Union shall be vested in the GovernorGeneral in Council, unless the appointment is delegated by the Governor-General in Council or by this Act or by a law of Parliament to some other authority.

16. All powers, authorities, and functions which at the establishment of the Union are in any of the Colonies vested in the Governor or in the Governor in Council, or in any authority of the Colony, shall, as far as the same continue in existence and are capable of being exercised after the establishment of the Union, be vested in the Governor-General or in the GovernorGeneral in Council, or in the authority exercising similar powers under the Union, as the case may be, except such powers and functions as are by this Act or may by a law of Parliament be vested in some other authority.

17. The command in chief of the naval and military forces within the Union is vested in the King or in the GovernorGeneral as his representative.

18. Save as in section 23 excepted, Pretoria shall be the seat of Government of the Union.

PART IV.-Parliament.

19. The legislative power of the Union shall be vested in the Parliament of the Union, herein called Parliament, which shall consist of the King, a Senate, and a House of Assembly.

20. The Governor-General may appoint such times for holding the sessions of Parliament as he thinks fit, and may also from time to time, by proclamation or otherwise, prorogue Parliament, and may in like manner dissolve the Senate and the House of Assembly simultaneously, or the House of Assembly alone Provided that the Senate shall not be dissolved within a period of ten years after the establishment of the Union, and provided further that the dissolution of the Senate shall not affect any senators nominated by the Governor-General in Council.

21. Parliament shall be summoned to meet not later than six months after the establishment of the Union.

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