The Political Life of the Right Honourable George Canning, from ... 1822 to the Period of His Death, in August, 1827. Together with a Short Review of Foreign Affairs Subsequently to that Event, Volumen1

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Longman, Rees, Orme, Brown and Green, 1831
 

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Página 481 - ... for action. You well know, gentlemen, how soon one of those stupendous masses, now reposing on their shadows in perfect stillness — how soon, upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing...
Página 137 - It never was, however, intended as an union for the government of the world, or for the superintendence of the internal affairs of other states.
Página 40 - Useful or necessary changes in legislation, and in the administration of States, ought only to emanate from the free will and the intelligent and well-weighed conviction of those whom God has rendered responsible for power.
Página 482 - ... upon any call of patriotism, or of necessity, it would assume the likeness of an animated thing, instinct with life and motion; how soon it would ruffle, as it were, its swelling plumage; how quickly it would put forth all its beauty and its bravery, collect its scattered elements of strength, and awaken its dormant thunder. Such as is one of...
Página 332 - If there be a determined project to interfere by force or by menace in the present struggle in Spain, so convinced are his majesty's government of the uselessness and danger of any such interference — so objectionable does it appear to them in principle, as well as utterly impracticable in execution, that when the necessity arises, or (I would rather say) when the opportunity offers, I am to instruct your grace at once frankly and peremptorily to declare, that to any such interference, come what...
Página 247 - leaves little hope of preserving peace. I have ordered the " recall of my minister. One hundred thousand Frenchmen, " commanded by a prince of my family — by him whom my " heart delights to call my son — are ready to march, invok
Página 481 - The resources created by peace are means of war. In cherishing those resources, we but accumulate those means. Our present repose is no more a proof of inability to act, than the state of inertness and inactivity in which I...
Página 481 - ... necessary, every month of peace that has since passed has but made us so much the more capable of exertion. The resources created by peace are means of war. In cherishing those resources, we but accumulate those means. Our present repose is no more a proof of inability to act, than...
Página 82 - Commons, or it must, occasionally, take the liberty to reject them. If it uniformly affirm, it is without the shadow of authority. But to presume to reject an act of the deputies of the whole nation! — by what assumption of right could three or four hundred great proprietors set themselves against the national will ? Grant the reformers, then, what they ask, on the principles on which they ask it, and it is utterly impossible that, after such a reform, the Constitution should long consist of more...
Página 336 - Congress as to France, was a promise of countenance and support from the allies in three specified hypothetical cases; — 1st, of an attack made by Spain on France ; 2d, of any outrage on the person of the King or Royal Family of Spain ; 3d, of any attempt to change the dynasty of that kingdom.

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