History of Europe from the Fall of Napoleon in 1815 to the Accession of Louis Napoleon in 1852, Volumen4

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W. Blackwood, 1855
 

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Bill to suppress the Catholic Association
33
3437 Argument of Ministers against the Catholic Associatio 3436
34
3841 Argument in support of the Association 3739
37
The bill is carried and immediately evaded
40
Catholic question and majority in the Commons on it
41
Fate of the bill in the House of Lords
44
CHAPTER XXI
45
Kings speech on the subject and letting out of bonded grain 4 Real causes of the distress and its remedy 511 Argument by Ministers in support of the ...
48
1215 Argument against the proposed measure 5356
53
Way in which prices affect this desire for political change
59
Way in which the changes it induced were brought about 20 Error in the debates in Parliament on both sides on this question
60
Vital points overlooked on both sides
61
What should have been done with the currency
62
Measures of relief proposed by Government
63
Banking system in Scotland and Ireland SAL 25 Sir Walter Scott prevents the suppression of small notes in Scotland and Ireland
65
Commencement of the emigration question
66
Appointment of a committee on emigration
67
Debate on the subject in the House of Commons
68
Reflections on this subject and its vast importance
69
3031 Prevailing errors on the subject 32 Finances
71
Motion for the repeal of the Corn Laws 3436 Argument for the repeal of the Corn Laws 7375
72
3740 Answer by Sir Francis Burdett 7678
76
Death of Diebitch and the Grandduke Constantine 685
78
Convulsions in all the north of Germany 505
84
3
87
Division on the question and interim admission of foreign grain 42 Character of Sir Francis Burdett
112
VOL IV
113
141
126
freeholders
141
Mr OConnell elected for the county of Clare
142
Immense results of this triumph
143
Mr Lawlesss progress to the north
144
Mr Sheils description of Ireland at this period
145
The Catholic Association interferes to moderate the transports
146
Proclamation of Government against the meetings
147
Meeting on Penenden Heath
148
The King in vain urges more vigorous measures against the Catholics
149
Difficulties with which the question was beset ib 123 Commencement of yielding in the Cabinet
151
Mr Dawsons speech at Londonderry
152
Ambiguous letter of the Duke of Wellington and explicit one of the LordLieutenant
154
Difficulties which Ministers had with the King on the subject
156
Kings speech
158
Immense sensation which this speech excited in the country
159
130139 Argument of Mr Peel in favour of the Catholics 160166
160
140146 Answer of the AntiCatholics 167172
171
Division on the question and violent resistance to the bill in the country
173
Speech of the Duke of Wellington in the Lords on the subject
174
The bill is carried in the Peers and by a large majority
175
Great reluctance of the King to the bill ib 151 Bill for disfranchising the fortyshilling freeholders
177
Mr OConnells claim for a seat before the bill is rejected
178
The second Clare election
179
His violent language and ingratitude
180
Character of Mr OConnell
181
Explanations of his inconsistencies in the Catholic faith
182
His good qualities
183
Catholic emancipation a victory gained by the highly educated classes over the people
185
Great difference between the results of emancipation and what was pre dicted by all parties
186
Emancipation was a wise and great measure
187
Religious differences unavoidable when religion is thought of at all
188
Unworthy spirit in which emancipation was received by the Roman Catholics
189
How it was that Catholic emancipation failed
190
Its beneficial effects on the English government
191
Emancipation would have equally failed if granted earlier or if it had been more complete
192
Emancipation has brought a righteous retribution to both parties
193
First effect of emancipation in inducing reform
194
Effects of reform in inducing Free Trade
195
Reflections on this subject
200
Statement of Mr Attwood as to the causes of Irish distress and agitation
210
213
213
31
216
be Financial measures and great reductions of Government
233
Which was occasioned by the contraction of the currency
240
Which also produced the cry for Reform
241
Disinclination of the Whigs generally to parliamentary reform
242
Various motions on parliamentary reform made in Parliament during the session of 1830
243
Character of George IV variously given by opposite parties
246
His remarkable talents ib 47 Great events of his reign
247
His failings and vices
248
And failings ib 52 His personal character and Queen
251
Precarious condition of Ministers after the accession of William IV
252
Prorogation and dissolution of Parliament and French Revolution
253
Result of the elections favourable to the Liberals
255
Distracted state of Ireland and entire failure of emancipation to pacify it
256
Successive efforts of the agitators and their influence on the elections
257
Opening of the Manchester and Liverpool Railway
258
And death of Mr Huskisson
259
Reflections on the railway system and its rapid growth
260
Its vast and lasting monetary effects ib 64 And moral and political effects
261
Its evils and dangers in the undue sway of the capital
263
Its political effects
264
Military results of the railway system ib 69 On the whole it augments the means of defending nations
265
Disturbances and incendiarism in the southern counties
266
Kings speech
267
Lord Greys declaration on reform
268
Duke of Wellingtons famous speech against any reform
269
Immense effect produced by this declaration
270
Mr Broughams plan of reform
271
Postponement of the Kings visit to the City
272
General consternation on the occasion
274
Speech of Mr Brougham on the occasion ib 79 Division on the Civil List leaves Ministers in a minority
275
CHAPTER XXIII
277
23 Causes which rendered the change so decisive
278
What had set these causes in motion
279
Excessive heat and drought of Great Britain in 1826
339
Preparations for insurrection by the political unions
342
Universal delusions which prevailed among the people ib 71 Rare examples of resistance to the general cry
343
Kings speech on opening Parliament
345
Motion to give members to the colonies negatived without a division
347
Marquess of Chandos motion on 50 tenants carried
349
Bill read a third time and passed
350
Bill thrown out by a majority of fortyone
351
Vote of confidence in the Commons carried by 131 ib 83 Disorders in London and in the country
354
Great meeting of political unions at Birmingham
355
Riots at Derby and Nottingham
356
Commencement of riots at Bristol
357
Frightful disorders
358
Immense destruction of property
359
Good effects of these dreadful scenes
360
The riots are at once suppressed when the military are ordered to act ib 91 Disturbances in other quarters
362
Proclamation against political unions
363
The New Reform Bill introduced
364
Increased democratic character of the new Bill
365
Division on the bill and Sir R Peels speech against it ib 96 Third reading carried in the Commons by 116 and Lord J Russells closing declaration
366
General distress in the country and Mr Hunts motion regarding it
367
103
368
State of Ireland
369
Dreadful tithe outrages in Wexford and Newton barry
370
The King submits and gives authority to create Peers
380
The Kings circular to the Opposition Peers to leave the House of Peers
381
Reflections on this event and on the act
382
The bill passes both Houses and receives the royal assent
383
The Scotch and Irish bills passed
384
Vast effects of the reform in Scotland and Ireland
385
The Reform Bill has strengthened Government by enlarging its basis
426
Where the risk now lies
427
Way in which the monied classes had got the command of the pro ducing
428
Enorinous sums spent by working classes in Great Britain on drink
429
Is this the result of a general law of nature ? ib 166 Great political truth evolved by the Reform Bill
430
Its exemplification in France and England
431
Great law of nature on the subject
432
CHAPTER XXIV
434
The real evils of society are not so certainly removed by these convulsions
435
Prosperity of the bourgeois class ib 4 The interests of the bourgeoisie were adverse to those of labour
436
Effect of the spread of machinery steam and railways
437
Increased strength of the Government
438
Dangers to which this led
439
their chances of success ib 9 The Napoleonists their chances
440
their chances
441
The Duke of Orléans remains in retirement
442
Important conversation between the Baron de Glandeves and Lafitte
443
Arguments for and against the Dukes being called to the crown 14 Project of giving the lieutenancygeneral to the Duke of Orléans and the crown to t...
444
First placards in the Orléans interest
445
Situation of the Duke of Orléans
446
Interview between M Thiers and the Duchess of Orléans ib 18 Irresolute conduct of the Duke of Orléans
447
Meetings of the Deputies and Peers
448
Meeting at the Chamber of Peers
449
Reunion of the Republicans at Lointiers
450
Scene at the Hôtel de Ville ib 23 Continued indecision at the Hôtel de Ville
451
Easy defeat of the Napoleonists
453
Panic of the Orléanists at Lafittes ib 26 Arrival of the Duke of Orléans at Paris and his interview with M
454
The Duke accepts the lieutenancygeneral of the kingdom
455
Guizots proclamation of the principles of the Government
456
Visit of the Duke of Orléans to the Hôtel de Ville
458
234
487
And in Brunswick
506
Political contests in Switzerland
507
Convulsions in Italy
508
Change in the order of succession in Spain
509
Its motives and political objects
510
Promulgation of the decree
511
Resumé of the influence of the Revolution in France over Europe
512
CHAPTER XXV
513
Cabinet divisions and fall of the Ministry
514
Commencement of the trial of the late Ministers
515
Conduct of the accused before the trial
516
Disturbed state of Paris before this
517
Commencement of the trial
519
Formation of M Lafittes ministry
521
Lafittes statement of the principles of his ministry
523
Arguments of M Sauzet for the accused ib 12 Condemnation and punishment of the accused
524
The accused are safely conveyed to Vincennes and thence to Ham
525
Disaffection of the National Guard and the misery of the capital
526
Demands of Lafayette
527
Dismissal of M de Lafayette from the command of the National Guard
528
Changes in the Cabinet
529
Favourable accounts from Algiers
530
Great additional expenditure for the army and its forces
531
Competition for the crown of Belgium and its final separation from Hol land
532
Crown of Belgium offered to Duke de Nemours
533
Protocol Jan 20 1831 fixing limits of Holland and Belgium
534
Views in London and Paris on Louis Philippes refusal
535
Weak and distracted state of Belgium ib 25 Perilous state of Italy
536
261
537
Intervention of Austria in Italy
539
Entry of the Austrians into Bologna and suppression of the insurrection
540
Affairs of Germany and precautionary measures there ib 30 Defensive measures in Austria
542
State of feeling in Prussia
543
Great fermentation in the lesser states of Germany
544
Troubles in Saxony and HesseCassel
545
Insurrection in Hanover
546
411
554
448
574
Süt
576
Vehement excitement in Paris on the fall of Warsaw
592
Bloody law against the Bourbons
593
Speech of M Pagès against the law
594
Striking speech of M de Martignac which causes the rejection of the clause
595
Question of the abolition of the hereditary peerage
596
9195 Argument for the abolition 597600
597
96100 Answer of the defenders of the peerage 601605
601
The Lower House pass the bill by a great majority
606
Creation of peers to force it through the Upper House where it passes ib 103 Reflections on this event
607
Previous degradation of the hereditary peerage
608
Experience of Great Britain in regard to a hereditary peerage
609
Reason of the superiority in general of the aristocracy as statesmen
611
Increased vigour and capacity this gives to the higher branches of the aristocracy
612
CHAPTER XXVI
614
Causes of this perpetual strife
615
Opposite sources of their strength and weakness
616
Disastrous effects of the conquest of the Byzantine Empire by the Turks and of the partition of Poland
617
Sin of Europe in the partition of Poland
618
Vast increase of the power of Russia from the partition of Poland
619
Faults of the Poles which led to their subjugation ib 8 It was the impatience of taxation which ruined Poland
620
Mysterious connection between Poland and the cause of democracy
622
Prosperity of Poland under the Russian rule from 1815 to 1830
623
This prosperity increased the passion for independence
624
Secret societies in Poland
626
Different plans of the conspirators ib 14 Original plan which proved abortive
627
Supineness of Constantine and progress of the conspiracy
628
Insurrection of 29th November at Warsaw
629
Rapid progress of the insurrection and retreat of Constantine from Warsaw
630
Appointment of a provisional government
631
First act of the new government and negotiation with Constantine
632
Constantine sends back the Polish troops and retreats into Russia
633
Enthusiasm on the arrival of the Polish troops in Warsaw
634
Chlopicki seizes the dictatorship
635
his biography and character
636
to the command
686
Insiirrection in Lithuania and final defeat of Gielgud ib 80 Battle of Wilna and defeat of the Poles
688
Desperate state of the Poles and plan of Paskiewitch
689
Paskiewitchs plans and forces and preparations of the Poles
690
Paskiewitch crosses the Vistula
691
621
692
Massacres in Warsaw
693
Preparations and forces on both sides for the final struggle
694
Victory of Ramorino over Rosen and Golowin
695
Vain attempt at negotiation
697
Fall of Warsaw ib 91 The remainder of the Polish troops take refuge in Austria and Prussia
698
Results of the war to both parties
699
Conduct of Nicholas in Poland after the war and in the cholera
700
Reflections on the fall of Poland
701
Democracy has doubled the strength of Russia and prevented the restora tion of Poland
702
Unity of the East is its strength divisions of the West its weakness
703
Restoration of Poland essential to independence of Europe
704

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