The Trend of History: Origins of Twentieth Century Problems

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Macmillan, 1922 - 372 páginas
 

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Página 54 - subject would be exposed to arbitrary control; for the judge would then be the legislator. Were it joined to the executive power the judge might behave with violence and oppression. "There would be an end of everything were the same man or the same body, whether of the nobles or of the
Página 131 - It is proper to state that I forego any advantage which could be derived to my argument from the idea of abstract right, as a thing independent of utility. I regard utility as the ultimate appeal on all ethical questions; but it must be utility in the largest sense, grounded on the permanent interests of man as a progressive being.
Página 98 - conformably to the words of the Holy Scriptures which command all men to consider each other as brethren, the three contracting monarchs will remain united by the bonds of a true and indissoluble fraternity, and, considering each other as fellow countrymen, they will, on all occasions and in all places, lend each other aid and assistance.
Página 34 - military, maritime, or criminal; this being the place where that absolute despotic power which must, in all governments, reside somewhere, is intrusted by the Constitution of these kingdoms. All mischiefs and grievances, operations and remedies, that transcend the ordinary course of the laws, are within the reach of this extraordinary tribunal. . . . It can,
Página 55 - and the effects derived from it I should say: As long as a people is compelled to obey and obeys, it does well; as soon as it can shake off the yoke, and shakes it off, it does better: for, recovering its liberty by the same right by which it was taken away, either
Página 64 - To evade the bondage of system and habit, of family maxims, class opinions, and in some degree of national prejudices; to accept tradition only as a means of information, and existing facts only as a lesson to be used in doing otherwise and doing better; to seek the reason of
Página 53 - In every government there are three sorts of power: the legislative; the executive in respect to things dependent on the law of nations; and the executive in regard to matters that depend on the civil
Página 34 - intrusted by the Constitution of these kingdoms. All mischiefs and grievances, operations and remedies, that transcend the ordinary course of the laws, are within the reach of this extraordinary tribunal. . . . It can, in short, do everything that is not naturally impossible to be done; and, therefore, some have not scrupled to call its power, by a figure rather too bold, the omnipotence of Parliament
Página 154 - Sovereignty cannot be represented for the same reason that it cannot be alienated; it consists essentially in the general will, and the will cannot be represented; it is the same or it is different; there is no mean.
Página 30 - As all human things have an end, the state we are speaking of will lose its liberty, will perish. Have not Rome, Sparta, and Carthage perished? It will perish when the legislative power shall be more corrupt than the executive.

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