Lives of Lord Castlereagh and Sir Charles Stewart, the Second and Third Marquesses of Londonderry: With Annals of Contemporary Events in which They Bore a Part ...

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W. Blackwood and Sons, 1861
 

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The bills pass and are immediately put in force
44
Rapid improvement in the state of the country
46
Commencement of Lord Castlereaghs great unpopularity
48
It was Revolution not Reform which he combated
50
Lord Castlereaghs extreme anxiety and liberal measures regarding it
51
Debate on Lord Castlereaghs Irish administration
52
Lord Castlereaghs reply
53
His treaties with Spain and the Netherlands for the suppression of the slave trade
54
Favourable reception of it by the Emperor Alexander and conclusion of the treaty with Spain
55
Similar treaties with Belgium
57
Meeting of the Congress of AixlaChapelle
60
Alexanders conversations with M de Richelieu
61
Noble conduct of the Duke of Wellington on this occasion
63
Convention for the evacuation of the French territories by the Allied troops
64
Secret convention between France and the four Allied Powers
65
Other questions for discussion regarding Greece South America and slave trade which led to Congress of Verona 168
66
Secret defensive treaty between the four great Powers
67
Secret reasons of these precautions
68
Universal pacific appearance of Europe
70
CHAPTER XVI
72
Remote cause of this new revolution in the constitution of 1812 pro claimed at Cadiz
73
Which is overturned on the return of Ferdinand VII on the peace
74
Revolutions in Portugal Naples and Piedmont
78
Line which Lord Castlereagh took on this crisis
80
Great prosperity in Great Britain in end of 1818 and beginning of 1819
82
State of the country and parties at the passing of the Currency Bill of 1819
83
Rapid increase of general distress from the resumption of cash payments
86
Rapid growth of discontent in the country
88
Finance resolutions of Mr Vansittart and Lord Castlereagh
89
Result of this debate
93
1820 Lord Castlereaghs speech on this occasion 95
95
Result of the debate and ultimate retribution inflicted on England in consequence
97
Calamities which in an especial manner it brought on Great Britain
98
Great meeting of the discontented ending in that at Peterloo near Man chester on August 16
99
General distress acknowledged in Parliament
100
2530 Lord Castlereaghs speech in proposing the bills for repressing the danger 102107
102
Result of the debate and passing of the bill
107
Cato Street conspiracy
109
Failure of the plot and execution of the leaders
110
Trial and execution of the conspirators
112
Abortive insurrection in Scotland
113
Unfortunate marriage of the Prince of Wales and its consequences
115
Further proceedings and failure of an attempted compromise
116
Immense sensation which the Queens return made in Great Britain
119
Views of the Radicals in this affair
120
Failure of an attempt at a compromise and commencement of the trial
121
Scene of the trial
123
The result on the abandonment of the bill
124
General enthusiasm on this event
126
Rapid reaction against the Queen
127
The Ministry remain at their posts notwithstanding
128
Dangerous aspect of affairs in Europe and South America
130
Alarm on the Continent at these events
131
Policy of the British Cabinet on the occasion
133
Lord Castlereaghs Cabinet minute
134
Congress of Troppau and Lord Castlereaghs private instructions to Lord Stewart
136
Proceedings of the Congress of Troppau
137
Meeting of the Congress at Laybach
142
Treaty between Austria Prussia and Russia
143
Sensation which this divergence of Great Britain produced in foreign Courts
145
The change was apparent only not real
146
Effect of this declaration from Troppau on the different states of Europe
148
Overthrow of the Neapolitan Revolution
150
Revolution in Piedmont and its suppression by the Austrians
152
Debate on these foreign affairs in Parliament
153
Return of popularity to Ministers
156
Coronation of George IV
159
Death of the Queen and dismissal of Sir R Wilson
160
Origin of the Greek and Spanish questions
162
Difficulties attending the Greek question
163
Difficulties of the Spanish question
165
rona 169171
169
Reflections on these instructions
171
Great distress in the country owing to the contraction of the currency by the bill of 1819
173
Lord Castlereaghs remedy by an extension of the currency
174
Breakdown of Lord Castlereaghs mind under the pressure of his public duties
175
Confirmation of the justice of his opinions which subsequent times have afforded
190
His powers as a parliamentary speaker
192
His occasional imprudence of expression
193
The courtesy and high breeding of his manners
194
Sir R Peels and Mr Crokers opinion of him Mr Whitbread and Lord Aberdeen
195
His character in private life
196
His generosity of disposition and benevolence of heart
198
His private munificence and liberality
199
His religious feelings and principles
200
His combined economy and liberality
201
Descent of his title and estates
202
CHAPTER XVII
203
His reluctance to become adjutantgeneral to Wellington and Lord Castlereaghs efforts to make him take the situation
204
Lord Stewart at the Congress of Vienna
206
Affection of the Prince Regent for Lord Stewart
207
Affection of William IV for Lord Stewart
208
Lord Castlereagh gets for him the Red Ribbon in January 1813
210
His services when Minister at Vienna from 1814 to 1822
211
Harry VaneTempest
213
Advantageous results of this marriage to Lord Stewart
214
Lord Castlereaghs confidential correspondence with Lord Stewart re garding the Queens trial
216
Queens arrival in London and correspondence regarding it
218
The bill is thrown out and Lord Castlereaghs letters regarding it
220
Lord Stewart resigns his situation at Vienna in consequence of Lord Castlereaghs death
223
Lord Londonderry acts along with the Duke of Wellington as plenipo tentiary at the Congress of Verona
227
Wellingtons important conversation with the Czar on his departure
229
The Dukes answer
232
Result of the Congress
234
Lord Londonderrys departure from Verona
237
CHAPTER XVIII
239
Lord Stewart is created Earl Vane and Viscount Seaham
240
His disinterested conduct in regard to Lord Bloomfield and appointment to the command of the 10th Hussars
241
And of the estate of Wynyard
242
Situation of Seaham in the county of Durham where Lord Byron was married
243
Which is bought by Lord Londonderry who commences the harbour of Seaham
244
Purchase of Holdernesse House in London and Garron Tower in Ireland
246
Death of Lord Liverpool and formation of Mr Cannings administration
248
State of political feeling in London regarding the new administration
250
Wellingtons difficulties in forming an administration
252
His views on the Catholic question
253
His steady opposition to the Reform Bill
254
His letter to Lords Harrowby and Wharneliffe and correspondence with Wellington ou Reform
256
Lord Londonderrys appointment as ambassador at St Petersburg in 1835
263
Who resigns it after the debate in the House of Commons
265
Which leads to bis journey to Sweden Russia and Constantinople
266
Their journey to Moscow Africa and Spain and again to Vienna and Constantinople
267
His duel with Mr Grattan in 1839
269
Reflections on this duel
272
Lord and Lady Londonderry again set out for Constantinople
273
Lord Londonderrys reception at Constantinople
274
He is made Colonel of the 2d Life Guards and LordLieutenant of Dur ham
276
Publication of his War in Germany
278
Publication of his letter to Lord Brougham on Lord Castlereagh
279
Which leads to the preparation of the Castlereagh Correspondence
282
Lord Londonderrys efforts on behalf of AbdelKader in Algeria
284
Which at length lead to his liberation after the accession of Louis Na poleon
285
Lord Londonderrys conduct on occasion of the monetary crisis of 1847
286
Lord Londonderry on April 10 1848
287
He officiates as one of the pallbearers at the funeral of the Duke of Wellington
288
Lord Londonderry gets Wellingtons Garter
289
Last public act of Lord Londonderry
292
His last days and commencement of the Sunderland Railway
294
His last illness and death
296
His family since his death
297
Particulars in which the two Lords Londonderry were similar in char acter
299
Points on which they differed
300
Causes of the hostility against both
301
Causes of the hostility against Sir Charles Stewart
302
Sir Charles Stewarts military character
303
Diplomatic career of both brothers
304
Sepulchral chamber at Wynyard
305
Manner in which Lady Londonderry has carried out his designs
306
APPENDIX
309
Index
341
His correspondence with Sir R Peel and the Duke of Wellington in 1834 258
366
His history of the Peninsular war 262
372

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Página 29 - They solemnly declare that the present Act has no other object than to publish in the face of the whole world their fixed resolution, both in the administration of their respective States and in their political relations with every other Government, to take for their sole guide the precepts of that Holy Religion, namely the precepts of Justice, Christian Charity and Peace...
Página 29 - Conformably to the words of the Holy Scriptures, which command all men to consider each other as brethren, the three contracting Monarchs will remain united by the bonds of a true and indissoluble fraternity, and, considering each other as fellow-countrymen, they will, on all occasions and in all places, lend each other aid and assistance...
Página 30 - ... as the sole means of enjoying that Peace which arises from a good conscience, and which alone is durable, to strengthen themselves every day more and more in the principles and exercise of the duties which the Divine Saviour has taught to mankind.
Página 30 - Him to whom alone power really belongs, because in Him alone are found all the treasures of love, science, and infinite wisdom, that is to say, God, our Divine Saviour, the Word of the Most High, the Word of Life.
Página 307 - The applause of listening senates to command, The threats of pain and ruin to despise, To scatter plenty o'er a smiling land, And read their history in a nation's eyes...
Página 30 - ... on all occasions and in all places, lend each other aid and assistance; and, regarding themselves towards their subjects and armies as fathers of families, they will lead them, in the same spirit of fraternity with which they are animated, to protect Religion, Peace, and Justice.
Página 30 - Princes looking on themselves as merely delegated by Providence to govern three branches of the one family, namely, Austria, Prussia and Russia: thus confessing that the Christian nation, of which they and their people form a part, has in reality no other Sovereign than Him to whom alone power really belongs...
Página 56 - Treaty, it shall not be lawful for any of the subjects of the Crown of Spain to purchase Slaves, or to carry on the Slave Trade on any part of the coast of Africa to the north of the Equator, upon any pretext or in any manner whatever...
Página 30 - important it is for the happiness of nations, too long agitated, that those " truths should henceforth exercise over the destinies of mankind all the " influence which belongs to them, will be received with equal ardour and " affection into this holy alliance.
Página 29 - Government, to take for their sole guide the precepts of that Holy Religion, namely, the precepts of Justice, Christian Charity, and Peace, which, far from being applicable only to private concerns, must have an immediate influence on the councils of princes, and guide all their steps, as being the only means of consolidating human institutions and remedying their imperfections.

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